3rd Wednesday Book Club- August 2013- Furreads

130-22-lLast month’s 3rd Wednesday Book Club followed the Read Watch Play theme of Furreads, which meant we spent lots of time reading and discussing Animal Tales (or Tails?). This reading theme was one of the most successful ones we’ve had this year and was greeted with great enthusiasm by our loyal book clubbers. In short, it was a “roaring” success.

August Reads 

Red Dog by Louis de Bernieres
Leviathan by Philip Hoare
The Snow Goose by Paul Gallico
The Incredible Journey by Sheila Every Burnford
The Ring of Bright Water by Gavin Maxwell
Trim by Matthew Flinders
The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
How Animals Grieve By Barbara J King
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Seabiscuit by Lauren Hillenbrand
Dogs from Riga by Henning Mankell
Burial Rites by Hannah Kent
Rifling Paradise by Jem Poster
My Place by Sally Morgan
The Lucky One by Nicholas Sparks
The Botticelli Secrets Marina Fiorato
Animal Farm by George Orwell
The Wilder Family by Kobie Kruger
The Light Between Oceans by  ML Stedman
Life After Life by Kate Atkinson
Swords and Crowns and Rings by Ruth Park
A Matter of Hope by Collette Livermore
Why Birds Sing by David Rotenburg
The Secret Life of Wombats by James Woodford
Rin Tin Tin: The Life and Legend of the World’s Most Famous Dog by Susan Orlean
The Haunted Book by Jeremy Dyson with Aiden Fox
The View from Castle Rock by Alice Munro
The Koran
Betrayal of Trust by JA Jance
The Lost Library by AM Dean
The Roswell Conspiracy by Boyd Morrison
Gershwin by Ruth Leon
The Ape House by Sara Gruen
Beauty in the Beasts: True Stories of Animals Who Choose to Do Good by Kristin Von Kreister
In the Presence of Horses by Barabara Dimmick
Motor Mouth by Janet Evanovich
The Griffith Review no.40 – Women in Power

Most Talked About Reads 

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Red Dog by Louis de Bernieres

‘In early 1998 I went to Perth in Western Australia in order to attend the literature festival, and part of the arrangement was that I should go to Karratha to do their first ever literary dinner. Karratha is a mining town a long way further north. The landscape is extraordinary, being composed of vast heaps of dark red earth and rock poking out of the never-ending bush. I imagine that Mars must have a similar feel to it.

I went exploring and discovered the bronze statue to Red Dog outside the town of Dampier. I felt straight away that I had to find out more about this splendid dog. A few months later I returned to Western Australia and spent two glorious weeks driving around collecting Red Dog stories and visiting the places that he knew, writing up the text as I went along. I hope my cat never finds out that I have written a story to celebrate the life of a dog.’ – Louis de Bernieres (from goodreads.com)

Reserve a copy of Red Dog at Shoalhaven Libraries now.

Trim by Matthew Flinders

‘Trim was a much-loved cat who accompanied Matthew Flinders on several of his voyages. Trim was to sail on four ships with Flinders, travelling from the Cape of Good Hope to Botany Bay, to England and back to Sydney Town. Flinders wrote Trim’s story whilst being held by the French in Mauritius.’ (from goodreads.com)

Burial Rites by Hannah Kent 

‘Set against Iceland’s stark landscape, Hannah Kent brings to vivid life the story of Agnes, who, charged with the brutal murder of her former master, is sent to an isolated farm to await execution.

Horrified at the prospect of housing a convicted murderer, the family at first avoids Agnes. Only Tóti, a priest Agnes has mysteriously chosen to be her spiritual guardian, seeks to understand her. But as Agnes’s death looms, the farmer’s wife and their daughters learn there is another side to the sensational story they’ve heard.

Riveting and rich with lyricism, BURIAL RITES evokes a dramatic existence in a distant time and place, and asks the question, how can one woman hope to endure when her life depends upon the stories told by others?’ (from goodreads.com)

Reserve a copy of Burial Rites at Shoalhaven Libraries now.

3rd Wednesday Book Club – July 2013 – Indigireads

Aboriginal Youths Here are the 3rd Wednesday Book Club reads from last month, Indigireads! As always we had a wide range of authors and genres to choose from, as well as some fabulous Indigireads from all around the world, too.

July Reads

Death comes to Pemberley by P.D. James
Great Australian Loneliness by Ernestine Hill
Burial Rites by Hannah Kent
People of the Whale by Linda Hogan
Roads to Quoz : an American Mosey by William Least Heat-Moon
Lame Deer Seeker of Visions by John (Fire) Lame Deer and Richard Erdoes
The Son by Philipp Meyer
Map of the Sky by Felix J. Palma
Pathfinder by Orson Scott Card
An Open House by David Boyd
A Delicate Truth by John Le Carre
Waging Peace: Reflections on Peace and War From an Unconventional Woman by Anne Deveson
And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini
Conditions of Faith by Alex Miller
The Childhood of Jesus by J.M. Coetzee
My Driver by Maggie Gee

Most Talked About Reads

JULY

Inferno by Dan Brown

“In the heart of Italy, Harvard professor of symbology Robert Langdon is drawn into a harrowing world centered on one of history’s most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces . . . Dante’s Inferno.

Against this backdrop, Langdon battles a chilling adversary and grapples with an ingenious riddle that pulls him into a landscape of classic art, secret passageways, and futuristic science. Drawing from Dante’s dark epic poem, Langdon races to find answers and decide whom to trust . . . before the world is irrevocably altered.” (from Goodreads.com)

“This novel has all the ear-marks of Brown’s other novels.  Yet, what makes the story more impressive is the underlying theme of global problems due to carbon pollution, diminishing fresh water supplies and overpopulation.  All the previous signs are symptoms of a disease or plague that will eventually destroy humanity in the not-too-distant future.  It is a topic that is foremost in today’s media.  For this reason, Inferno is an interesting and thought provoking work.

Quote from the book:  “If you could throw a switch and randomly kill half the population on earth, would you do it?  OK, but what if you were told that if you didn’t throw that switch right now the human race would be extinct in the next 100 years?  […]  Would you throw it then?  Even if it meant you might murder friends, family and possibly even yourself?  Would you kill half the population today in order to save our species from extinction?”” – Elaine, from 3rd Wednesday Book Club.

Reserve a copy of Inferno at Shoalhaven Libraries today.

Solar by Ian McEwan

“Michael Beard is a Nobel prize–winning physicist whose best work is behind him. Trading on his reputation, he speaks for enormous fees, lends his name to the letterheads of renowned scientific institutions, and half-heartedly heads a government-backed initiative tackling global warming. While he coasts along in his professional life, Michael’s personal life is another matter entirely. His fifth marriage is crumbling under the weight of his infidelities. But this time the tables are turned: His wife is having an affair, and Michael realizes he is still in love with her. 

When Michael’s personal and professional lives begin to intersect in unexpected ways, an opportunity presents itself in the guise of an invitation to travel to New Mexico. Here is a chance for him to extricate himself from his marital problems, reinvigorate his career, and very possibly save the world from environmental disaster. Can a man who has made a mess of his life clean up the messes of humanity?” (from Goodreads.com

This novel made our most talked about list because it features THE most disliked character of nearly all time (as voted by the 3rd Wednesday Book Club). Elaine, one of our long-time members, says: “Must admit that the underlying story of solar energy is admirable, but found the main character totally offensive.”

Interested? Reserve a copy of Solar by Ian McEwan at Shoalhaven Libraries today.

Qissat : Short Stories by Palestinian Women by Jo Glanville

“These fascinating and diverse stories reflect the everyday concerns of Palestinians living under occupation. Writers who were children during the first Intifada appear alongside those who remember the outbreak of the Lebanese civil war.

In this volume, Palestinian women offer compassionate, often critical, insight into their society in times of hardship and turmoil, yet look beyond to the warmth of human relations and the hope that better times will come.

These twelve stories are diverse in every way but one: they are all by women whose lives have been distorted by the loss of a homeland they can call their own.” (from Goodreads.com). Reserve a copy of Qissat at Shoalhaven Libraries today.

Tales of the Alhambra by Washington Irving

This book was read by one of our book club members, Barbara, whilst travelling in this very same region of Spain many years ago. Reserve a copy here.

Am I Black Enough For You by Anita Heiss

“What does it mean to be Aboriginal? Why is Australia so obsessed with notions of identity? Anita Heiss, successful author and passionate campaigner for Aboriginal literacy, was born a member of the Wiradjuri nation of central New South Wales, but was raised in the suburbs of Sydney and educated at the local Catholic school. She is Aboriginal – however, this does not mean she likes to go barefoot and, please, don’t ask her to camp in the desert.

After years of stereotyping Aboriginal Australians as either settlement dwellers or rioters in Redfern, the Australian media have discovered a new crime to charge them with: being too ‘fair-skinned’ to be an Australian Aboriginal. Such accusations led to Anita’s involvement in one of the most important and sensational Australian legal decisions of the 21st-century when she joined others in charging a newspaper columnist with breaching the Racial Discrimination Act. He was found guilty, and the repercussions continue.

In this deeply personal memoir, told in her distinctive, wry style, Anita Heiss gives a first-hand account of her experiences as a woman with an Aboriginal mother and Austrian father, and explains the development of her activist consciousness.

Read her story and ask: what does it take for someone to be black enough for you?”

”This is a warm, funny, but also achingly sad book.” Lyn – 3rd Wednesday Book Club

Reserve a copy of Am I Black Enough For You? at Shoalhaven Libraries today.

The Local Wildlife by Robert Drewe

Welcome to the Northern Rivers, where the ‘local wildlife’ can refer to more than just the exotic native fauna. After a decade spent in this picturesque corner of Australia, home of chocolate-coated women, pythons in the ceiling, online Russian brides, deadly paralysis ticks, and the mysterious Mullumbimby Monster, Robert Drewe wiped the green zinc cream from his face and set down some of the unusual wildlife experiences that the far north coast of New South Wales – home of the world’s greatest variety of ants – has to offer.

Drewe’s trademark gentle wit, acute observational powers and mastery of the English language are all on display in this collection of sketches and anecdotes based on the quirkiness of daily life. His sharp eye for human foibles – including his own – is tempered with a generosity of spirit.

Tall tales from Australia’s master of the short story – but this time these short, short stories are true.” (from Goodreads.com)

”This book of true short stories is delightful, full of deliciously quirky characters – both animal and human…” – Lyn, 3rd Wednesday Book Club.

Reserve a copy of The Local Wildlife at Shoalhaven Libraries today.

3rd Wednesday Book Club – June 2013 – Faraway

The Read, Watch, Play theme for June was Faraway. Here at Nowra Library we  chose to focus on travel fiction  because, we figure, books take you places. There’s nothing like armchair travel- curling up with an amazing book filled with the sights, scents and shades of a far away  place or time. Happy travels!

June Reads     

Blue Highways : A Journey into America by William Least Heat-Moon
Slicing the Silence : Voyaging to Antarctica  by Tom Griffiths
Questions of Travel  by Michelle de Kretser.  (Miles Franklin winner 2013)
The Library of Unrequited Love by Sophie Divry
The Railwayman’s Wife by Ashley Hay
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Perfume Collector by Kathleen Tessaro
Mason & Dixon by Thomas Pynchon
Life of Pi :a novel  by Yann Martel
Ox Travels : Meetings with Remarkable Travel Writers edited by Mark Ellingham et al
I Hear the Sirens in the Street  by Adrian McKinty
Fishing for Tigers :a novel by Emily Maguire
Benediction by Kent Haruf.
Journey of a Thousand Miles : My Story by Lang Lang with David Ritz.
Kennedy’s Brain by Henning Mankell
Empire Day by Diane Armstrong
The Artemis Fowl series by Eoin Colfer
Australian Science Magazine
Kennedy’s Brain by Henning Mankel
Los Angeles Stories by Ry Cooder
Sweeney Todd:  The Real Story of the Demon Barber of Fleet Street by Peter Haining
Wild Nights by Joyce Carol Oates
A Plea for Eros by Siri Hustvedt
Entangled by Graham Hancock
The Oldest Song in the World by Sue Woolfe
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
Perfume by Patrick Susskind
A Feast for Crows by George R.R Martin
Map of the Sky by Felix J. Palma

Most Talked About Reads

June2013

Blue Highways : A Journey into America by William Least Heat-Moon

“Hailed as a masterpiece of American travel writing, Blue Highways is an unforgettable journey along our nation’s backroads. William Least Heat-Moon set out with little more than the need to put home behind him and a sense of curiosity about “those little towns that get on the map-if they get on at all-only because some cartographer has a blank space to fill: Remote, Oregon; Simplicity, Virginia; New Freedom, Pennsylvania; New Hope, Tennessee; Why, Arizona; Whynot, Mississippi. His adventures, his discoveries, and his recollections of the extraordinary people he encountered along the way amount to a revelation of the true American experience.” (Goodreads.com)
‘This book is like a warm bath. You feel like you’re sitting in the passenger side of the author’s van as he drives along the highway.’- Michael, 3rd Wednesday Book Club.

Click here to reserve a copy of Blue Highways at Shoalhaven Libraries today.


The Railwayman’s Wife by Ashley Hay

“In a small town on the land’s edge, in the strange space at a war’s end, a widow, a poet and a doctor each try to find their own peace, and their own new story.

In Thirroul, in 1948, people chase their dreams through the books in the railway’s library. Anikka Lachlan searches for solace after her life is destroyed by a single random act. Roy McKinnon, who found poetry in the mess of war, has lost his words and his hope. Frank McKinnon is trapped by the guilt of those his treatment and care failed on their first day of freedom. All three struggle with the same question: how now to be alive.

Written in clear, shining prose and with an eloquent understanding of the human heart, The Railwayman’s Wife explores the power of beginnings and endings, and how hard it can be sometimes to tell them apart. It’s a story of life, loss and what comes after; of connection and separation, longing and acceptance. Most of all, it celebrates love in all its forms, and the beauty of discovering that loving someone can be as extraordinary as being loved yourself.

A story that will break your heart with hope.” (Goodreads.com)

Click here to reserve a copy of The Railwayman’s Wife at Shoalhaven Libraries today.

Sweeney Todd: The Real Story of the Demon Barber of Fleet Street by Peter Haining 

“Sweeney Todd, the notorious Demon Barber, has been called the greatest mass murderer in English history. With the aid of an ingenious revolving chair and a cut-throat razor, he is said to have robbed and butchered more than 160 victims in his barber shop in Fleet Street, before taking the remains to nearby Bell Yard where his accomplice, Margery Lovett, cooked their flesh for her meat pies. Despite being as infamous in London’s history as Jack the Ripper, Todd’s story has been almost completely ignored by historians. In this definitive biography, Peter Haining delves into the grim underworld of London 150 years ago to expose the man behind the myth. Separating fact from fiction, he reveals a gruesome and bizarre story with a unique criminal heart.” (Goodreads.com)

“Set from the late 1700’s to the present this bio tells the story of the infamous murderer Sweeney Todd who was known as the “Fleet Street Murderer” and his accomplice Mrs. Lovett, a famous pie maker.  The book also tells how the story of Todd has been “kept alive” in print, theatre and movies over the last 200+ years.

Fascinating!  Interesting!  Could not put it down!  Once again Haining has written a well-researched, enjoyable and informative read!” – Elaine, 3rd Wednesday Book Club

Click here to reserve a copy of Sweeney Todd at Shoalhaven Libraries today.

Questions of Travel by Michelle de Kretser

“A mesmerising literary novel, Questions of Travel charts two very different lives. Laura travels the world before returning to Sydney, where she works for a publisher of travel guides. Ravi dreams of being a tourist until he is driven from Sri Lanka by devastating events.

Around these two superbly drawn characters, a double narrative assembles an enthralling array of people, places and stories – from Theo, whose life plays out in the long shadow of the past, to Hana, an Ethiopian woman determined to reinvent herself in Australia.

Award-winning author Michelle de Kretser illuminates travel, work and modern dreams in this brilliant evocation of the way we live now. Wonderfully written, Questions of Travel is an extraordinary work of imagination – a transformative, very funny and intensely moving novel.” (Goodreads.com)

Click here to reserve a copy of Questions of Travel at Shoalhaven Libraries today.

Word of the Day

‘Epistolary’ (epis·to·lary, adj.)  The word epistolary is derived from the Greek word ἐπιστολή epistolē, meaning a letter. Epistolary novels are those which are written as a series of documents, such as letters, diary entries, and newspaper clippings. Examples of novels written wholly or partly in the epistolary form include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Alice Walker’s The Colour Purple, Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding and We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver.


Author Love-In

Ashley Hay

Ash Horiz B&W A

Author Ashley Hay (from http://www.ashleyhay.com.au)

Ashley Hay’s four books of narrative non-fiction –The Secret and Gum, and Herbarium and Museum (the latter two in collaboration with photographer Robyn Stacey) – all reveal an ongoing fascination for stories about fabulous people and their obsessions.

Her essays, short stories and journalism have appeared in anthologies and magazines including Brothers and SistersThe MonthlyThe BulletinBest Australian Essays, Heat and When Books Die.

The Body in the Clouds, her first novel, was published by Allen & Unwin in September 2010 and described by The Weekend Australian as “a gorgeous, Fabergé egg of a book, enamelled with literary resonances and rhyming symbols, which we will still be reading decades from now”.

Her second novel, The Railwayman’s Wife, will be published in April 2013 – preceded by a five-star review from Australian Bookseller and Publisher. Gail Jones (author of Five Bells) has praised it as “a tender portrait of a marriage and the poetry and grief it contains; a beautiful, dreamy, melancholy book.”  (from ashleyhay.com.au)

Ashley Hay at Thirroul, NSW (from www.theage.com.au)

Ashley Hay at Thirroul, NSW (from http://www.theage.com.au)

3rd Wednesday Book Club- May 2013- Artreads

For this month’s theme, Artreads, we looked at book covers and book art. What goes into making a good book cover? What attracts us to certain book covers? And the all-important question- do you judge books by their covers?

We were fortunate in that at the same time we were pondering on the answers to these questions, award winning Australian author Kate Forsyth happened to wander into Nowra Library (don’t you love it when authors wander in at precisely the right moment?) Kate was happy to talk about the cover art on her novel Bitter Greens with us in an imromptu interview session in the tea room, moments before she appeared for an author talk in the library upstairs.

Bitter Greens is a re-telling of the traditional fairy tale ‘Rapunzel’, interwoven with the story of the woman who first published the fairy tale, French courtier Charlotte Rose de la Force. Much of the novel is set in the Palace of Versailles, at the Court of the Sun King Louis XIV, and also in Venice, where Petrosinella, the ‘Rapunzel’ character, resides. Also living in Venice is Selena Leonelli, the sorceress who buys Petrosinella for  ‘a handful of bitter greens,’ whose beautiful red hair inspires the artist Tiziano Vecelli (Titian.) For these reasons, Kate explained, the image of a beautiful young woman with tumbling red hair graces the cover of Bitter Greens.

b_bitter-greens

Kate also told us that the novel spans two distinct historical periods — Renaissance Venice and 17th Century France, which both feature in the over design. Venice lies in the distance behind our mystreious red haired lady, while the beautiful scroll work at the edges of the cover  is based on a traditional French wall-paper from the 17th century. The antiquity of the fairy-tale and the artistic essence of the novel is further echoed in the parchment- like quality of the sky above Venice.

“Looks as ancient as the fairy-tale,” according to Kate!

Thanks, Kate!

We also chatted to our book club members this month about how they feel about book covers. Opinions varied. Some people feel that the cover design has little to do with their reading choices, while others are very sensitive about the physical appearance of books they choose to read. One of our members chose books this month based entirely on their covers, and was pleasantly surprised with the new authors she discovered this way. (Personally, I love book covers, especially beautiful fantasy and historical ones, and I love adding new books to my shelves. So much so that I often purchase books I love in both print and e-book formats, so I can have the best of both worlds- my Kindle in my handbag, and shelves of beautiful books at home. Perfect!- Kelly)

Now, for our May reads….

The Chimney Sweeper’s Boy by Barbara Vine
The Lifeboat by Charlotte Rogan
Follow the Money by Peter Corris
A Kingdom Beseiged by Raymond E. Feist
A Feast for Crows by George R.R Martin
The Wild Girl by Kate Forsyth
Vlad the Impaler: In Search of the Real Dracula by M. J. Trow
The Man Who Lives With Wolves by Shaun Ellis
The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien
Harvest (Hyddenworld 3) by William Horwood
Here and Now: Letters (2008- 2011) by Paul Auster and J.M Coetzee
Foe by J.M. Coetzee
Youth by J.M. Coetzee
Rosebud: The Story of Orson Welles by David Thomson
Lost Voices by Christopher J. Koch
Affinity by Sarah Waters
London by Edward Rutherford
Mr Vertigo by Paul Auster
Journey to the Stone Country by Alex Miller
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Frye by Rachel Joyce
Spies by Michael Frayn
An Experiment in Love by Hilary Mantel

What makes a good book? We decided it should be easy to read, use appropriate language to the setting and character, voice and point of view, have intriguing characters, a story that grips you and keeps you turning pages, and, as well as all that, have clarity, credibility and beauty. That’s not too much to ask for, is it?

Happy reading!

3rd Wednesday Book Club – April 2013 – CrimeReads

This month’s book club theme was Crimereads, and our book clubbers were faced with a veritable banquet of murder and gore- there’s just so much crime fiction out there to choose from. Of course we had our usual mix of genres and tastes as well, along with with our man of the moment, Paul Auster : )

April Reads

Stravinsky’s Lunch by Drusilla Modjeska
The Invisible by Paul Auster
The Music of Chance by Paul Auster
Unplugged by  Eosin Colfer
7 Ways to Kill a Cat by Matias Nespolo
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
The Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie
The Woods by Harlen Coben
The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion
Portrait of a Killer by Patricia Cornwell
Miracle Cure by Harlen Coben
Listening to Country by Ros Moriarty
Nefertiti Street by Pamela Bradley
The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters
Mr Vertigo by Paul Auster
Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion
Death Comes to Pemberley by PD James
Murder in the Ashhram: Welcome to the Dark Side of Delhi by Kathleen McCaul
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
The End by Bianca Nogrady
Fetish by Tara Moss
Here and Now- Letters 2008-2011 by Paul Auster and J.M Coetzee
Beyond the Red Notebook Essays on Paul Auster (Penn Studies in Contemporary American Fiction)
The World that is the Book – Paul Auster’s Fiction by Aliki Varvogli
HG Wells- Another Kind of Life by Michael Sherborne
Point Omega by Don DeLillo
Kraken by China Mieville

Most Talked About Reads

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Portrait of a Killer by Patricia Cornwell

‘This non-fiction book is about one of the most horrific and unsolved murder mysteries in history.  Examining old case files and remaining evidence of the 114 year old unsolved murders with 21st century technology, the author has written an exhaustive, alternate and highly probable analysis of the true identity of Jack the Ripper:  a famous actor and artist named Walter Sickert.  Ripper mythology has always been a consuming passion for me.  Many people who have also read and reviewed this exposé clearly feel that parallel times, places and events in Walter Sickert’s life are just coincidence.  That begs the question that after 2 or 3 unexplained and coincidental events happen (and more and more follow), at what point should the evidence be taken seriously and the Jack the Ripper identity and case be considered closed?  The author has convinced me and this book is an eye opener and well worth reading.’ – Elaine

Kraken by China Mieville

‘There is a preserved giant squid in the Natural History Museum in London and curator Billy Harrow is in charge of the visiting tour groups.  One day the squid disappears and so begins the search for it which leads Billy to things he could never have imagined.  Among these are “…warring cults, surreal magic, assassins, mythical gods and the end of the world.”
Only read 136 pages of the 481.  To call this science fiction would be an insult to the genre.  Full of annoying and weird characters as well as foul language, the reader cannot help but think that the end of the world cannot happen soon enough.  Mankind deserves extinction.’ – Elaine

The End: The Human Experience of Death by Bianca Nogrady

‘The author, a freelance science journalist takes us on a journey to understand death from every conceivable angle – spiritual, physical, metaphysical.  From chapters on why we die; palliative care; dying at home  to death and belief, this book may be just what we all need to help dispel our fear of death.   Nogrady covers organ donations, palliative care, diagnosing death, where to die and so on.  Fascinating and informative.’ -Lyn

Listening to Country by Ros Moriarty

‘Ros Moriarty is a white woman married to an Aboriginal man.  This warm and wonderful book tells of an emotional journey Ros takes with women of her husband’s Aboriginal family to perform ceremony  for women only.  Much of this even Ros herself is forbidden to talk about.  The book also tells the story of Ros’s husband, John, and his abrupt removal from his mother at the age of 4.  It also details John and Ros’s  life, their children and the path of their design company Balarinji.  The Balarinji company were the designers of the Aboriginal paintings on the Qantas jets and so much more.  The warmth of the Aboriginal women shines through as does their love for each other, the children and the newcomer, Ros.  They are such forgiving people despite the hardships inflicted by whites and white settlement.  Humour abounds such as the story (pp.58-59) of their elderly neighbor, Glad.  So many of them  are still suffering from the various diseases that lack of good nutrition and housing can cause.  I felt despair when I read of the way the tribe can be isolated in the wet season and often runs out of food, despite requests to the government to improve the road to enable them to get to town to purchase food at ridiculously inflated prices.  Great read.’ -Lyn

Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion

”R’ is a zombie. He has no name, no memories and no pulse, but he has dreams. He is a little different from his fellow Dead.
Amongst the ruins of an abandoned city, R meets a girl. Her name is Julie and she is the opposite of everything he knows – warm and bright and very much alive, she is a blast of colour in a dreary grey landscape. For reasons he can’t understand, R chooses to save Julie instead of eating her, and a tense yet strangely tender relationship begins.
This has never happened before. It breaks the rules and defies logic, but R is no longer content with life in the grave. He wants to breathe again, he wants to live, and Julie wants to help him. But their grim, rotting world won’t be changed without a fight…’ (From goodreads.com)

Author Love- In: Henning Mankell

2f5f03596b9a0a7d9362d4_L__V188025836_SX200_“Although my father passed away before my first novel was published I knew he believed in me and was confident that I would have success as a writer.”

Henning Mankell was born in Stockholm 1948. When he was two years old the family moved to Sveg where the father worked as a court judge. The family lived in the court house in Sveg and young Henning much enjoyed listening to the grown-ups discussions on crime and punishment. At age 16 Henning Mankell dropped out of school in order to work as a merchant seaman for two years before settling in Paris. After a year and a half in the French capital, Henning returned to Sweden and got a job as a stagehand in a Stockholm theatre.

In 1973, Mankell released his debut novel, Bergsprängaren (The Rock Blast). In the same year, he went to Africa for the first time. Ever since he has divided his time between Africa and Sweden and since 1986 he is the artistic leader of Teatro Avenida in Maputo, Mozambique.

In 1991, the first novel in the Wallander series, Faceless Killers, was published. Since, Henning Mankell has written nine more novels in the series, including the novel Before the Frost, about Kurt Wallander’s daughter Linda. Next to the Wallander novels, Mankell has also written more than twenty novels and a dozen children’s and youth books. In addition, he is also one of Sweden’s most frequently performed dramatists.

And, lastly- what genre is Jane Eyre, anyway?

We had some discussion about what genre of fiction Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre falls under. I have always considered it to be a mix of Gothic and Romance, although it’s interesting to see what others think…

Sparknotes.com says Jane Eyre is a “hybrid of three genres: the Gothic novel (utilizes the mysterious, the supernatural, the horrific, the romantic); the romance novel (emphasizes love and passion, represents the notion of lovers destined for each other); and the Bildungsroman (narrates the story of a character’s internal development as he or she undergoes a succession of encounters with the external world).”

Shmoop.com puts dear old Jane into no less than 5 genres: Coming of age, Romance, Gothic, Mystery and Autobiography.

‘We know, that’s five genres – but Jane Eyre is a complex book, OK? Think about it – there’s the whole following-Jane-from-her-sad-childhood-as-an-orphan-to-her-happy-marriage thing, which definitely sounds like a “Coming-of-Age” story to us, especially because at every stage we’re focused on her developing morals and ethics.

jane-eyreJane’s passionate attachment to Rochester definitely makes this qualify as a “Romance” – think of all the times Rochester grasps her and clasps her to his chest. Whew! We get hot and steamy just thinking about it.

Then there are all the supernatural and “Gothic Fiction” elements. Even though most of them get explained away – Bertha may look like a vampire, but she’s just a woman from Jamaica struck with madness – the novel depends on making us feel that creepy, suspenseful atmosphere.

There’s definitely a strong “Mystery” quality here; like a younger version of Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple (whose first name, we’d like to point out, is also Jane), Jane gradually unravels Rochester’s seedy past to figure out what’s going on in the attic at Thornfield.

Then there’s the issue of “Autobiography,” which is the subtitle: after all, the novel is called Jane Eyre: An Autobiography. Because this is a first-person novel, our protagonist describes herself as though she’s telling us her autobiography…but since she’s not real, it isn’t exactly one.’ Hmm. Interesting.

Other sources we perused also put Jane Eyre in the Bildungsroman genre – and if you’re thinking ‘huh’ when you see Bildungsroman (so are we) here’s a little definition:  ‘Bildungsroman [is] a class of novel that deals with the maturation process, with how and why the protagonist develops as he does, both morally and psychologically. The German word Bildungsroman means “novel of education” or “novel of formation.” (www.britannica.com)

You don’t say?

: )

3rd Wednesday Book Club March 2013 – Ecoreads/Dystopian Fiction (and zombies!)

We had loads of fun at our March Book Club meeting (well, I did, anyway!) Lots of great book discussion and plenty of enthusiasm and new reading discoveries made for a great meeting. The group’s love affair with American author Paul Auster continues, with more of our members joining this author love-in every month. Check out the list of March reads and you’ll see what I mean…..

March Reads @ 3rd Wednesday Book Club

Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Solar by Ian McEwan
The People Smuggler by Robin de Crespigny
The Book of Illusions by Paul Auster
Tiger’s Eye by Ingo Clendinnen
The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng
55 Scotland Street Series by Alexander McCall Smith
Storm Warning by Billy Graham
The Circle Trilogy (Morrigan’s Cross, Dance of the Gods & Valley of Silence) by Nora Roberts
Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker
Invisible by Paul Auster
Shoes of the Fishermen by Morris West
The Stepford Wives by Ira Levin
Timbuktoo by Paul Auster
The Red Notebook by Paul Auster
Leviathan by Paul Auster
Moon Palace by Paul Auster
Music of Chance by Paul Auster
The Hunger Games Trilogy (The Hunger Games, Catching Fire, Mockingjay) by Suzanne Collins
The Tom Hanks Enigma (bio) by David Gardner
Moon Palace by Paul Auster
The Dark Side of Genius: the Life of Alfred Hitchcock by Donald Spoto
Travels in the Scriptorium by Paul Auster
Listening to Country by Ross Moriarty
A Storm of Swords (A Song of Ice and Fire Part 3) by George R.R Martin
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
In the Country of Last Things by Paul Auster

See? : )

Most Talked About Reads

marchbookclubtitles

The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker

“It still amazes me how little we really knew. . . . Maybe everything that happened to me and my family had nothing at all to do with the slowing. It’s possible, I guess. But I doubt it. I doubt it very much.”

Luminous, haunting, unforgettable, The Age of Miracles is a stunning fiction debut by a superb new writer, a story about coming of age during extraordinary times, about people going on with their lives in an era of profound uncertainty.

On a seemingly ordinary Saturday in a California suburb, 11-year-old Julia and her family awake to discover, along with the rest of the world, that the rotation of the earth has suddenly begun to slow. The days and nights grow longer and longer, gravity is affected, the environment is thrown into disarray. Yet as she struggles to navigate an ever-shifting landscape, Julia is also coping with the normal disasters of everyday life–the fissures in her parents’ marriage, the loss of old friends, the hopeful anguish of first love, the bizarre behavior of her grandfather who, convinced of a government conspiracy, spends his days obsessively cataloging his possessions. As Julia adjusts to the new normal, the slowing inexorably continues.

With spare, graceful prose and the emotional wisdom of a born storyteller, Karen Thompson Walker has created a singular narrator in Julia, a resilient and insightful young girl, and a moving portrait of family life set against the backdrop of an utterly altered world.’ (from Goodreads.com)

Invisible by Paul Auster

‘“One of America’s greatest novelists” dazzlingly reinvents the coming-of-age story in his most passionate and surprising book to date.

Sinuously constructed in four interlocking parts, Paul Auster’s fifteenth novel opens in New York City in the spring of 1967, when twenty-year-old Adam Walker, an aspiring poet and student at Columbia University, meets the enigmatic Frenchman Rudolf Born and his silent and seductive girfriend, Margot. Before long, Walker finds himself caught in a perverse triangle that leads to a sudden, shocking act of violence that will alter the course of his life.

Three different narrators tell the story of Invisible, a novel that travels in time from 1967 to 2007 and moves from Morningside Heights, to the Left Bank of Paris, to a remote island in the Caribbean. It is a book of youthful rage, unbridled sexual hunger, and a relentless quest for justice. With uncompromising insight, Auster takes us into the shadowy borderland between truth and memory, between authorship and identity, to produce a work of unforgettable power that confirms his reputation as “one of America’s most spectacularly inventive writers.”’ (from Goodreads.com)

Listening to Country by Ros Moriarty

“From a trip made by the author to the Australian desert to spend time learning the secrets and hearing the stories of her husband’s family’s matriarchs, comes a warm, intimate account providing rare insight into the spiritual and emotional world of Aboriginal women.

Ros Moriarty is a white woman married to an Aboriginal man. Over the course of many visits to her husband’s family, she was fascinated to discover that the older tribal women of his family had a deep sense of happiness and purpose that transcended the abject material poverty, illness, and increasing violence of their community—a happiness that she feels is related to an essential “warmth of heart” that these women say has gone missing in today’s world. In May 2006, she had the chance to spend time in the Tanami Desert in north central Australia with 200 Aboriginal women, performing women’s Law ceremonies. Here is the story of that trip and her friendship with these women, as she tells their stories and passes on their wisdom and understanding. Offering a privileged window into the spiritual and emotional world of Aboriginal women, this book is a moving story of common human experience, the getting and passing on of wisdom, and the deep friendship and bonds between women. It carries a moving and profound sense of optimism in the fundamental humanity we all share.” (from Goodreads.com)

Oryx & Crake by Margaret Atwood

“I tried to read this for our March Dystopian read i.e. “The end of our world as we know it.” At first I quite enjoyed the story, but gradually the horror of what I was reading began to get to me.  I realized it was because the hideous things happening in the novel, even though exaggerated, could very well happen, actually aspects of it were happening now – uncontrolled environmental damage; further class division based solely on income;  science gone mad (that is, experimental science, for example, Pigoons now roamed the landscape freely and were huge and dangerous.  And where did they come from?  Originally pigs were used to grow parts for humans!)  The total insensitivity of people to other people and animals’ suffering; the growth of any type of pornography and “snuff” on the web; the development of a race of people of all colours who had no education, hope etc., all this as a result of a mischievous experiment by a young student.  I just couldn’t finish it and had a few nightmares too!!” – Lyn

Shoes of the Fishermen (The Vatican Trilogy #1) by Morris West

“The pope has died, and the corridors of the Vatican hum with intrigue as cardinals from all over the world gather to choose his successor. Suddenly, the election is concluded – with a surprise result. The new pope is the youngest cardinal of all – and a Russian. Shoes of the Fisherman slowly unravels the heartwarming and profound story of Kiril Lakota, a cardinal who reluctantly steps out from behind the Iron Curtain to lead the Catholic Church and to grapple with the many issues facing the contemporary world.(from Goodreads.com)

The Dark Side of Genius – The Life of Alfred Hitchcock by Donald Spoto

As the title suggests this is an in-depth bio of Hitchcock.  Nothing is left untold.  Within the 555 pages are also comments, reviews and a history of the film industry.

Hitchcock may have been a genius of film, but beneath that he was a sadistic, self-centred, emotionally crippled man.  This begs the question:  “are geniuses deranged and flawed people?”  This is a tough and long-winded read, but it was most enjoyable from the history of film perspective.  FYI the most engrossing and MUST READ part of the book is Chapter 13.  To give you an idea of Hitch’s mindset, 2 of his favourite things were Edvard Munch’s painting “The Scream” and Hieronymous Bosch’s painting “The Garden of Earthly Delights”.  Another bit of interesting trivia is the fact that Hitch also had one of Walter Sickert’s artworks in his collection.” – Elaine

And lastly…

I think some of our book club members thought I was joking when I talked about the newest hype in the speculative fiction world, Post Apocalyptic Zombie Romance (or, zom rom com). Well, I wasn’t. Click here to read a Goodreads.com list of books called ‘Zombie Romance’  (including such titles as ‘Hungry For You,’ ‘Alice in Zombieland’ and ‘Confessions of a Zombie Lover.’) Also keep an eye out for Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion (you can reserve your copy here), which, as well as being number one on the list, has been made into a film due for release here in Australia this week. Looks like fun! – Kelly

Read, Watch, Play 2013 – March is Ecoreads & Dystopian Fiction

6116062998_2d4e533d1bThe Read Watch Play theme for this month is Ecoreads. This is the time to read and discuss books and ideas about ecology, environment, water use and conservation.  2013 is the International Year of Water Cooperation, and it’s a great time to read up on the environmental and sustainability issues we face, and the ways we might improve them.

We’ve embraced Ecoreads this month at Nowra Library, but we’ve also found another way of exploring it- the dark side of conservation and sustainability, if you will. What would happen if none of our plans, ideas, environmental awareness and hard work paid off? What if the world we know …. ended?

photo of display

What if we found ourselves in….dystopia?

The Road, based on Cormac McCarthy's novel.

The Road, based on Cormac McCarthy’s novel.

Dystopian fiction is is a branch of Speculative Fiction, and is often closely related to Science Fiction. It is often set in a futuristic,post-apocalyptic or post-cataclysmic society characterised by environmental disaster, totalitarian governments and dehumanisation.  Social issues, as well as those of environment, technology, politics, are often explored. As the name suggests, ‘Dystopia’ is the opposite of ‘Utopia’,  the term first coined by Sir Thomas More in his 1516 work Utopia, which describes an ideal society, perfect and just. The word is similar to the Greek word “outopos ” – “no place”- and “eutopos” – “good place.”  No wonder then that Dystopian fiction is often fraught with sadness, desperation, desolation and struggle.

Katniss in The Hunger Games film.

Katniss in The Hunger Games film.

Famous works of dystopian fiction include Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 and George Orwell’s Ninteen Eighty- Four. Recent popular additions to the genre include The Hunger Games  series by Suzanne Collins, Divergent by Veronica Roth, The Road by Cormac McCarthy, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro and Lois Lowry’s The Giver.  (You can also view or reserve these items on the Shoalhaven Libraries Catalogue).

This month at Nowra Library our 3rd Wednesday Book Club members will be reading and discussing Ecoreads, but the discussion doesn’t end there. You can join the live Twitter discussion on 26 March starting at 8.00pm EDT, and join readers from Australia, New Zealand, Singapore (and who knows where else!) as they discuss their favourite Ecoreads.

Use the tags #ecoread and #rwpchat as you discuss, so others can join in the conversation too. For more information on how to take part in Twitter book discussions, check out the Read Watch Play blog.  

Happy reading (and tweeting!)

3rd Wednesday Book Club- February 2013- Heartreads

photoWe had a lovely meeting yesterday here at Nowra Library with our 3rd Wednesday Book Club members. The theme for February is Heartreads, which is the second of the Read Play Watch themes for 2013. We’ve added our own flavour to each of the Read Play Watch themes this year, and this month, we focused on broken hearts, bad relationships and unhappily ever afters. It was great to hear everyone’s broken heart reads, and nice to see some happy endings in there as well.

February Reads

The Lovers of Algeria by Anouar Benmalek
This is Where I Am by Karen Campbell 
Murder on the Ballarat Train by Kerry Greenwood
Ravenscraig by Sandi Krawchecnko Altner
Klondike House: Memoirs of an Irish Country Childhood by John Dwyer
The Dubar Case by Peter Corris
Murder She Wrote- Domestic Malice (Murder She Wrote #38) by Jessica Fletcher
The 19th Wife by David Ebershoff
By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept by Elizabeth Smart
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
This is How by MJ Hyland
Timbuktu by Paul Auster
The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Wondrous Times on the Frontier by Dee Brown
The Dog Stars by Peter Heller
The Legend of Broken by Caleb Carr
The Last Runaway by Tracy Chevalier
Philida by Andre Brink
The Tapestries by Kien Nguyen
Light Falling on Bamboo by Lawrence Scott
Lighthouse Bay by Kimberley Freeman
Poet’s Cottage by Josephine Pennicott
Travels in the Scriptorium by Paul Auster
The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey
Secrets in the Sands by Sara Sheridan
The Kiss by Kate Chopin
Leonardo and the Last Supper by Ross King

Most Talked About Books

9781860468681

The 19th Wife by David Ebershoff

Sweeping and lyrical, spellbinding and unforgettable, David Ebershoff’s The 19th Wife combines epic historical fiction with a modern murder mystery to create a brilliant novel of literary suspense. It is 1875, and Ann Eliza Young has recently separated from her powerful husband, Brigham Young, prophet and leader of the Mormon Church. Expelled and an outcast, Ann Eliza embarks on a crusade to end polygamy in the United States. A rich account of a family’s polygamous history is revealed, including how a young woman became a plural wife.
Soon after Ann Eliza’s story begins, a second exquisite narrative unfolds–a tale of murder involving a polygamist family in present-day Utah. Jordan Scott, a young man who was thrown out of his fundamentalist sect years earlier, must reenter the world that cast him aside in order to discover the truth behind his father’s death. And as Ann Eliza’s narrative intertwines with that of Jordan’s search, readers are pulled deeper into the mysteries of love and faith. (from www.goodreads.com)

Timbuktu by Paul Auster

‘Magnificent! Outstanding! This is the story of a dog named Mr. Bones and his owner Willy G. Christmas who is dying. Told from the viewpoint of the dog it is a captivating story of love, humour and tragedy that ultimately makes you think about what being human is all about. This book made me laugh and cry all at the same time. It also follows all the ‘rules’ in writing that make up a good book. Put it on your MUST READ list.’ (Elaine, 3rd Wednesday Book Club).

Klondike House: Memoirs of an Irish Country Childhood by John Dwyer

The eldest of six children, John Dwyer recounts his memories of a rural childhood on the remote but beautiful Beara Peninsula in West Cork, Ireland. Complemented by a series of childhood photographs, his stories are told in vivid and colourful prose. He describes the hard but happy work of saving the hay, cutting the turf, shearing the sheep, and digging the potatoes. His humour comes to the fore as he describes a rampaging sheep and an innocent hobby nearly caused a local outcry. His account of his own family connections with America and especially Butte, Montana are a microcosm of all Irish-American stories of immigration. Sprinkled with a selection of fitting works by some of Ireland’s best-known poets such as Seamus Heaney, Patrick Kavanagh and Paul Muldoon, this gem of a book is a chronicle of the simple but happy life of an Irish farmer boy (from www.goodreads.com).

The Lovers of Algeria by Alouar Benmalek

Benmalik is Moroccan born, but as an adult writer, he had to flee to France and now lives there, although he holds both French and Algerian citizenships. The Algeria of this book is unbelievably brutal – someone is killed, tortured in the most horrible way every day, no one fares well.  Anna (a Swiss/German woman working in the circus) and Nassreddine, an Algerian are married and the story opens as they travel to a small village to live in 1955.  A hideous crime occurs and Anna and  Nassreddine are separated.  Forty years later, Anna, now a widow, returns to Algeria to search for Nassreddine.  This is a very dangerous enterprise, because foreigners are being murdered every day.  Anna’s search, with flashbacks to the past make this a stomach-turning read about a country that has been in turmoil for years.  The story covers the years 1928-1997, from the country living under French colonialism, to claiming independence, to falling in the hands of ruthless rulers “The Terrorists” i.e. Islamists. However, I am glad I made the effort to read this wonderful book (Lyn, 3rd Wednesday Book Club).

3rd Wednesday Book Club- January 2013- Summer Reads

Welcome back! It was great to see everyone back after a safe and happy festive season. The first of our themes this year is Summer Reads. This is our interpretation of the Read Play Watch reading themes this year. Read Play Watch is an initiative of the NSW Readers Advisory Working Group, who last year were responsible for bringing us our lovely National Year of Reading themes. This year at Nowra Library we will be loosely following the Read Play Watch themes with our own special twist. Here we go!  

Summer Reads

Murder on the Ballarat Train by
Kerry Greenwood
Foal’s Bread by Gillian Mears  
Man in the Dark by Paul Auster
Trouble at the Little Village School by Gervase Phinn
Winter Journal by Paul Auster
Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel
The End of Your Life Book Club by Will Schwalbe
The Woman Reader by Belinda Jack
Summer Lies by Bernhard Schlink 
Man Gone Down by Michael Thomas
The Forgotten Wars by C.A Bayly
New Finnish Grammar by Diego Maravi 
The Golden Land by Di Morrissey
The Foundling by Agnes Desarthe
The Mousetrap by Ruth Hanka Eigner  
After Such Kindness by Gaynor Arnold
The Streets by Anthony Quinn
Poet’s Cottage by Josephine Pennicott
Medea by Kerry Greenwood
The Dinosaur Feather by Sisset Jo Gazan
Flying Crows by Jim Lehrer
Maestro by Peter Goldsworthy
Fragile Things by Neil Gaiman
Wanting by Richard Flanagan  
The Twelve by Justin Cronin
Possession: A Romance by A.S Byatt
The Tenderness of Wolves by Steph Penney
The Invention of Solitude by Paul Auster

Most talked about reads

Winter Journal by Paul Auster

Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel

After Such Kindness by Gaynor Arnold

Author Love-In – Kerry Greenwood

Writers'_Week_Kerry_Greenwood_Adelaide_Festival_mediumKerry Greenwood was born in the Melbourne suburb of Footscray and after wandering far and wide, she returned to live there. She has a degree in English and Law from Melbourne University and was admitted to the legal profession on the 1st April 1982, a day which she finds both soothing and significant. Kerry has written twenty novels, a number of plays, including The Troubadours with Stephen D’Arcy, is an award-winning children’s writer and has edited and contributed to several anthologies. In 1996 she published a book of essays on female murderers called Things She Loves: Why women Kill.

The Phryne Fisher series (pronounced Fry-knee, to rhyme with briny) began in 1989 with Cocaine Blues which was a great success. Kerry has written sixteen books in this series with no sign yet of Miss Fisher hanging up her pearl-handled pistol. Kerry says that as long as people want to read them, she can keep writing them.

Kerry Greenwood has worked as a folk singer, factory hand, director, producer, translator, costume-maker, cook and is currently a solicitor. When she is not writing, she works as a locum solicitor for the Victorian Legal Aid. She is also the unpaid curator of seven thousand books, three cats (Attila, Belladonna and Ashe) and a computer called Apple (which squeaks). She embroiders very well but cannot knit. She has flown planes and leapt out of them (with a parachute) in an attempt to cure her fear of heights (she is now terrified of jumping out of planes but can climb ladders without fear). She can detect second-hand bookshops from blocks away and is often found within them.

For fun Kerry reads science fiction/fantasy and detective stories. She is not married, has no children and lives with a registered wizard. When she is not doing any of the above she stares blankly out of the window.

Stars of 2012- the books and authors our borrowers and staff couldn’t put down.

MC900438756[1]Now that the dust from 2012 has settled, we’ve had a chance to reflect on the reading year that was. To muse, if you will, upon the highs and the lows, the tragedies, triumphs, and surprises. To recognise the moments of literary awesomeness that glittered through our reading year like falling stars.  We caught some of those falling stars and put them in our pockets. Here they are:


Authors with the highest number of loans in 2012:

Peter Corris (Australian)
Trudi Canavan (Fantasy)
Catherine Cookson (General fiction)
Georgette Heyer (Historical)
Dean Koontz (Horror)
Kathy Lette (Humour)
Anne Perry (Mystery)
Norah Roberts (Romance)
Patrick O’Brian (Sea Stories)
A.S Byatt (Short Stories)
James Patterson (Thriller)
W.E Griffiths (War Stories)
Giles Tippette (Westerns)
James Patterson (Young Fiction)

Most reserved items of 2012:

Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel
A Wanted Man by Lee Child
Fifty Shades of Grey (trilogy) by E.L James
The Light Between Oceans by M.L Stedman
All That I Am by Anna Funder
Tick Tock by James Patterson
Bloodline by Linda la Plant
Opal Desert by Di Morrissey
Winter of the World by Ken Follett
A Game of Thrones by George R.R Martin
Daughters of Mars by Tom Keneally

Best Books of 2012 as chosen by our 3rd Wednesday Book Club members:

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon & Journal of a Novel by John Steinbeck (Anne)
Rena’s Promise by Rena Kornreich Gelissen (Joan)
Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel (Everald)
The Book of Illusions by Paul Auster & Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden (Elaine)
A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry and The Idea of Home: Boyer lectures 2011 by Geraldine Brooks (Lyn)
(To be continued…)

Staff favourites for 2012:

Debbie- The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Kristin- The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
Gail- The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton
Carol- The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Marie- The Bay by Di Morrissey
Jessica- How to Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran (non-fiction)
Charlotte Street by Danny Warren (fiction)
by Laura Buzo
Noela-  This is How by M.J Hyland
Sarah – Daughter of Smoke & Bone by Laini Taylor
Talulla Rising by Glen Duncan
Kelly-  Sea Hearts by Margo Lanagan
Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott (non-fiction)
The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey
The Last Werewolf and Talulla Rising by Glen Duncan
Paul- Cape Horn: The Logical Route by Bernard Moitessier
Bronwyn- The Convent by Maureen McCarthy
The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
The Absolutist by John Boyne

Which books and authors shone brightest for you in 2012?  We’d love to hear about them!