Australian Women Writers Challenge 2012- Challenge Complete

Well, it ‘s almost the end of 2012 and of the Australian Women Writers Reading & Reviewing Challenge.

Here at Nowra Library we displayed and promoted books written by Aussie women for most of 2012, with great success. Loans and circulation of these books increased noticeably throughout the year and it was great to see a wide range of borrowers walk out the door with newly discovered Australian reads.

Similarly, members of library staff who read and contributed reviews for the challenge also made new literary discoveries. Here is a list of the reviews published here at The Readers’ Haven throughout 2012:

Good Oil by Laura Buzo – Jessica
Sea Hearts by Margo Lanagan- Kelly
Bitter Greens by Kate Forsyth- Kelly
The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton- Gail
The Independence of Miss Mary Bennet by Colleen McCullough – Marie
The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton- Nicole
The Precipice by Virginia Duigan- Sarah
Tiger Men by Judy Nunn- Marie  

Australian Women Writers Challenge Review- The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton

‘The latest novel by Kate Morton is an absorbing tale of a woman haunted, after witnessing a crime committed by her mother, when she was a teenager.  As time goes by Laurel  becomes distant from her family but now, many years later, she is trying to piece together the reason behind her mother’s actions.

A successful actress, Laurel returns home to care for her dying mother and in the process begins to delve into her mother’s past discovering who her mother was and is.  This is a story about family, their sense of identity, misunderstandings, secrets, love and forgiveness.  A thoroughly enjoyable and absorbing read.  A real page turner!’

– Gail

For more information about The Australian Women Writers Reading & Reviewing Challenge, click here

Australian Women Writers 2012 Challenge Review- ‘Tiger Men’ by Judy Nunn

In true Nunn form this is a family saga set in the golden years of Tasmanian settlement and expansion. It follows the lives of three men, Silas Sandford, philanthropist and business man, Jefferson Powell, political idealist and ferryman and  Mick O’Callaghan, Irish rogue from convict days, through the Federation period and The Great War. The novel showcases the contrast between the wealthy elite, with their grand sandstone mansions, to the exploited poor who live in the Wapping slum area of Hobart.  Each main character’s ability to take advantage of the changing world of Hobart town caused their lives and families to prosper as they moved into the 20th century.

Tiger Men also explores the way the women in each of the main character’s lives showed courage, strength and endurance- thus the analogy to the Tasmanian tiger.

This is a great read if you enjoy a mix of Aussie history with your fiction as I do. You always learn something new.  

                                                                                                                                                                           Cheers, Marie

 http://www.australianwomenwriters.com